Tip Thai Restaurant

Living out in the burbs definitely has its benefits, but sometimes it can be difficult to find new and exciting places to eat. (Going all the way out to the West End for ramen is always a pain). Generally my eating adventures have me journeying westward from my home base of Coquitlam, but sometimes my family likes to travel east into PoCo for some eats. Since we’re all big fans of Thai food, we decided to try out Tip Thai one night to see if it’d measure up to the Thai restaurants in Vancouver.

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We started off with the Tom Yum Kung ($6.95) as usual. The soup consisted of halved tomatoes, prawns, and button mushrooms. It tasted like every other version I’ve had of this soup, sour and refreshing but also quite spicy. The broth tasted strongly of lemongrass, while the prawns were pleasantly fat and juicy. We used the soup to clear our palates when consuming the other dishes. I liked that they didn’t hold back on the spices, which made it taste that much more authentic and delicious.

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And of course we had to have the Green Curry ($9.95), which is a personal favourite of mine. We were able to choose the level of spiciness for this dish, and we opted for medium. As expected, the curry tasted strongly of coconut milk, and was both sweet and savoury. It was full of large pieces of soft eggplant, and small pieces of moist chicken. The curry itself had a strong, spicy aftertaste, making it great to eat alongside the rice.

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Instead of ordering a plain rice on the side, we had the Tip Thai Fried Rice ($9.95), Jasmine rice stir-fried with onions, tomatoes, and broccoli. This was a normal fried rice, really, with nothing blatantly Thai about it. But then again, it was a good dish to have at the table, especially if you’re not crazy about spicy foods. The rice itself was slightly salty, but other than that, it was tasty, if slightly unmemorable.

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We had another Thai classic in the Pad Thai ($9.95), served with egg, bean sprouts, onion, pressed tofu, and topped with crushed peanuts.  I was well-satisfied with the version here, which had none of that ketchup stickiness but instead the tanginess and sweetness from tamarind sauce. The noodles themselves were chewy and toothsome, exactly the way they should be.

DSC_0014We had more noodles in the form of Pad Se-Ew ($9.95), thicker rice noodles stir-fried with soy sauce, egg, carrots, cabbages, and broccoli. Like the pad thai, the noodles here were pleasantly chewy, while the beef was moist, tender, and easy to chew. The dish had an overall savoury, slightly salty taste, which was to be expected, I suppose. While I enjoyed these noodles, for me, nothing can ever beat a good pad thai.

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And lastly, we had the Pad Pak Ruam-mit ($9.95), which was, for me, the least familiar dish out of the ones we sampled. Despite the unfamiliar name, the dish was rather simple, with vegetables and chicken stir-fried in garlic sauce. It wasn’t a bad dish to be sure, but nothing incredibly memorable, and to be honest, there was no real discernible taste other than the saltiness. If I were to visit again, I probably wouldn’t order this dish a second time.

Overall, the food we had at Tip Thai was decent, but nothing special, and quite typical of a restaurant its size. I suppose we should also factor in the location. Let’s face it: I wouldn’t expect mind-bogglingly amazing Thai food from a small restaurant in PoCo. In any case, though, the service was prompt, and the food arrived at our table at the speed of light, despite the presence of other patrons in the restaurant. So if you happen to be in PoCo and in need of a quick lunch or dinner, Tip Thai would be a decent spot. I mean, of course there’s better places for Thai food, but probably not anywhere close by.

Tip Thai Restaurant
2606 Shaughnessy Street
Port Coquitlam, BC
Tip Thai Restaurant on Urbanspoon


Blue Lagoon

Sightseeing in London can be a battle. A battle against the oppressive July heat, against the huddled masses of tourists on the Tube, against the sticky humidity that leaves you feeling like you just spent days in the jungle when you’d only showered an hour before. Sometimes when I stood in line for hours at a particularly popular tourist attraction, I became lost in thoughts about how I was just another cow in a herd of tourists, and sometimes I started devising an escape plan in case the swarms of tourists around me succumbed to Black Friday syndrome and proceeded to simply stampede their way into whatever monument/museum/palace I happened to be at, much like the wildebeests in The Lion King. Still, these morbid thoughts didn’t stop me from visiting every tourist attraction in London that I could manage, including, of course, the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace.

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Dolph, Pickles and I arrived at Buckingham Palace by walking from Green Park station through Hyde Park. We were an hour early, but of course there were already swarms of tourists lining the gates. We managed to get decent spots near the gate to observe the changing of the guard, and the Guards band played the title song from Skyfall, which was fun. To be honest, it was a lot of waiting, but it’s not everyday that you get to see the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace. In any case, we spent the rest of the day doing some more touristy things, including purchasing tea at Fortnum & Mason and visiting the National Gallery, which houses, among other pieces, Van Gogh’s Armchair. I’m not much of an art critic, but I have a special love of Van Gogh, so I was a happy camper. One of the best things about London is that many of the museums and galleries, including the National Gallery and the British Museum, are free, which is always a bonus when you’re on a tight budget.

DSCN0642We ended up wandering into Blue Lagoon, a small Thai restaurant nearby. It was a relatively small restaurant, and we were the only patrons when we walked in, which was relatively early, possibly around 5 PM. The three of us spent a short amount of time perusing the regular menu before deciding to order the 2 course set dinner, which was on special for £10 and included a set of three appetizers and a main dish of your choice. We then waited for our food to come, and in addition to the usual awkwardness of being the only table of patrons at a restaurant, I found the waiting process particularly awkward here. For one thing, there was a server who was leaning against a wall opposite our table for the longest time, without doing any work. We had the uncomfortable feeling that he was watching us, and while it’s generally considered a good thing for a waiter to be keeping his eye on you, it was excessive here to the point that we found it uncomfortable. In any case, onwards to the food…

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First to arrive, of course, was our plate of Appetizers: some chicken skewers, spring rolls, and toast with prawn paste. Considering that this was essentially a plate of grilled and fried foods, it was oily and satisfying. It also came out piping hot, which is great except that I hadn’t expected it and ended up burning my tongue. In any case, I found the toast with prawn paste especially interesting, since I’d never had it before–the toast was crunchy and was also topped with sesame seeds, which added a nice texture. The chicken was moist, while the spring rolls were fried up nicely, and the peanut sauce was a good balance between creamy and chunky. Greasy food is so comforting after a long day of walking.

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Our main courses arrived soon after. Pickles had chosen the Yellow Curry, which was accompanied by a bowl of rice. We were disappointed to see that the rice was short-grain, as opposed to the long-grain rice that is usually served at Thai restaurants. Pickles also found that the yellow curry wasn’t aromatic enough, and that there wasn’t enough of a signature curry flavour to it, either. I generally enjoy the strong flavour of coconut milk in yellow curries, but it wasn’t too apparent here.

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Dolph went for a classic in the Pad Thai. Out of the three of us, I think she was the most satisfied with her meal. The noodles had a very pleasing, chewy and bouncy texture. Although the prawns were more on the mushy side than having a natural snap, she thought that the plentiful amount of prawns included more than made up for it.

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I, meanwhile, opted for my usual favourite, the Green Curry, which included aubergine, chicken, and red and green peppers. I liked that it tasted strongly of coconut milk while still retaining a nice spicy aftertaste. However, soon after finishing this meal, I felt light-headed and a bit queasy. You could blame this on the heat and the fact that I’d been walking all day, but I do have strong suspicions that our meal had copious amounts of MSG, which I suppose is to be expected. Too much MSG makes me feel light-headed and thirsty, though, which is pretty much what happened here.

Would I recommend a meal at Blue Lagoon? Probably not. Although the food was passable, it wasn’t authentic Thai food. Plus, the service was awkward to the point that it was a bit intimidating. I actually had a much more pleasant experience at another Thai restaurant nearby the next week, so I would recommend you pass on Blue Lagoon.

Blue Lagoon
23 Haymarket
London SW1Y 4DG
United Kingdom

Blue Lagoon on Urbanspoon


Misato

After our 4-day stay in Dublin, Pickles, Dolph and I returned to London and settled into our accommodations for the next three weeks. Since our breakfasts were included in the costs of the program, we only had to take care of our lunches and dinners. For me, this inevitably lead to overconsumption of my favourite Starbucks drink (the iced chai latte), as well as some cold ready-to-eat items from M&S Simply Food. London was abnormally warm during our stay, often going over 30° Celsius (or 86° Fahrenheit if you’re Celsius-illiterate like I am). Cold pasta salads from M&S were my saviour when I wasn’t in the mood for a hot meal, which was often.

Still, once in a while, you’re just in the mood for a warm dinner, so the three of us decided to go eat at Misato, a Japanese restaurant in London’s Chinatown, which Dolph had visited earlier in the week. After consuming so many prepackaged sandwiches and pasta salads, I was excited to have some warm steamed rice and yummy Japanese food.

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Pickles decided to indulge in Japanese-style comfort food with the Chicken Katsu Curry with Rice (£6). She was more than pleased with her meal, which was a better value for its price than pretty much any other meal we’d had so far in London. The chicken was crispy and well-fried, but also moist on the inside, while the rice was warm and comforting. The curry tasted mildly salty as opposed to sweet, which I found different than the other Japanese curries I’ve tried, but we still enjoyed it nevertheless. The little salad accompanying her meal was fine, but nothing memorable, and honestly, the chicken and rice were more than what we’d expected for the price.

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Meanwhile, Dolph ordered the Tempura Soba (£5.50). She regretted this afterwards, saying that she wished she’d gotten a tempura udon instead, but no matter. The three of us agreed that we all enjoyed soba served cold, as in zaru soba, but I guess that’s just personal preference. Since the tempura was served in the soup, it was naturally soggy, losing its crispiness. While the portion size was large, the broth was predominantly salty and had little else in the way of flavour. Out of the three dishes we ordered, I guess I would have to say that this was the least satisfying, although it might be just our personal preferences.

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Lastly, I had the Grilled Mackerel with Rice (£4.50). Since about a week earlier, I’d had an intense craving for grilled mackerel, which my mom cooks up for me on a regular basis at home. I’ve noticed that a lot of people I know tend to shy away from mackerel, probably because of its intense fishiness, but that’s exactly what I love about mackerel–besides, why eat fish if you’re afraid of the fishiness?  In any case, I had to order the mackerel once I saw it on the menu, and I was both pleased with the huge portion size as well as the price, which was only £1 more expensive than that Starbucks chai latte I mentioned earlier. In any case, the mackerel was obviously a bit oily, as it was fried, but it was both salty and satisfyingly fishy, as mackerel should be. It was also easy to eat, as there were no noticeable bones, and the lemon slice helped to alleviate some of the fishiness. The salad was more or less the same as the one included with the chicken katsu curry. Although this made me miss home more than ever, I still was comforted by the idea that I could find something similar to my mom’s home-cooked meals in London’s Chinatown, of all places.

Overall, I was really happy with our meal here. Out of the restaurants I ate at during my three week stay in London, I would have to say that the prices at Misato were the best fit for my broke-student/broke-tourist budget. I know that the cost of living in Vancouver is quite high and often a source of stress for me and my fellow Vancouverites, but sometimes the food prices in London just baffled me, especially once I learned to intuitively apply the correct conversion rate. Of course, London is a huge city with many different types of cuisine to offer, but if you’re on a budget and near Piccadilly Circus, I would highly recommend Misato, which is not only a frugal option but a tasty one as well.

Misato
11 Wardour Street
London W1D 6PG
United Kingdom

Misato on Urbanspoon


Siddhartha’s Indian Kitchen

I haven’t purchased a package from VANEATS.ca since my meal at Ebisu a year ago. I remember that meal as being fulfilling, but admittedly lacklustre. Still, I purchased the package available for Siddhartha’s Indian Kitchen, a small, relatively new Indian restaurant on the Drive. I love Indian food and hadn’t had it in a while, and the reviews of the package seemed quite positive overall. So on a rainy Monday, SB and I headed down the Drive to redeem our meal for two.

The restaurant itself was clean, but a bit empty during our visit. I suppose that’s to be expected for a small restaurant on a Monday night, though. We took our seats by the window and informed the server of our VanEats package, and added on another curry for good measure. The package itself cost $18.

DSC_0006The first dish of our meal to arrive was the Aloo Tiki, two crispy potato cakes served with a blend of Delhi, tamarind, and mango sauces topped with pomegranate and cilantro. The first dish of any meal is important in setting the tone for the entire meal, especially if it’s your first visit to the restaurant. Sadly, this dish was a flop. On the bright side, these little cakes were crispy on the outside, which was a nice textural contrast from the dense inside. However, parts of the inside were seriously cold, like it had just come out of the freezer. It was just unacceptable and inedible. There was really no excuse for this, especially considering that there were only two tables occupied at this point in our meal (and the other table hadn’t even ordered yet). The sauces were both sweet and savoury, and reminded me of tonkatsu sauce. It would have been a good dish otherwise, but the inside being frozen and cold was just a horrible first experience. We were seriously unimpressed by this, which set the tone for the rest of the meal.

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Next up, we had the Cucumber Salad, which was a small portion of fresh cucumber, onion, tomato, and bell peppers. The veggies seemed fresh, which is all I really ask for in a salad. It was a refreshing way to clear our palates when sampling our various curries.

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The curries included in the VanEats package were the Chicken Korma on the left and the Butter Chicken on the right. Of these two, we preferred the korma, which tasted strongly of coconut. It was creamy and sweet, but also had a spicy aftertaste that we enjoyed. However, the meat was quite dry, which could have been fixed if it had been served in smaller pieces. Meanwhile, the butter chicken was different from what we’ve had at other Indian restaurants. It was quite thick and creamy, and for some reason reminded us of Campbell’s mushroom soup. It had less of a strong tomato flavour, and the chicken again was quite dry. The creamy texture of it was so overwhelming that we couldn’t really notice much else about the dish. The accompanying rice was undercooked and quite hard in some places, although it was of a decent portion size.

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Lastly, we also added the Chennai Lamb Curry ($13.99), figuring that we wouldn’t get full from the VanEats package alone. I personally love lamb, but I wasn’t a huge fan of this. The curry itself was very oily (as you can see from the photo), and incredibly salty. The more you ate of it, the more you noticed the saltiness. It was fine when eaten with the rice, but it was still a tad too salty for my tastes. The lamb, like the chicken in the other curries, was quite dry, and served in large pieces. To their credit, it didn’t taste overly gamy, as tends to happen with lamb. There were no other real discernible ingredients in the curry other than the lamb–no potatoes or anything, which made it a bit uninteresting to eat as well.

In any case, I would categorize our dinner at Siddhartha’s as unmemorable. Although the rest of the meal was average, the frozen inside of the aloo tiki left us sorely unimpressed and a tad disturbed. Still, judging by the number of positive reviews they’ve garnered online, it appears that our experience doesn’t reflect on their usual food preparation practices. Still, as much as I love Indian food, I probably wouldn’t return to Siddhartha’s again.

Siddhartha’s Indian Kitchen
2066 Commercial Drive
Vancouver, BC

Siddhartha's Indian Kitchen on Urbanspoon


Mui Garden (Permanently Closed)

My family and I have exhausted most of the Korean eating options around North Road, the boundary between Burnaby and Coquitlam. Despite being Vancouver’s unofficial Koreatown, there actually aren’t that many great Korean restaurants to eat at. Then again, I don’t enjoy eating out for Korean food when I have such an excellent chef at home (my mother, not me). Once again, my parents wanted to try something new, so we decided to lunch at the North Road location of Mui Garden.

The restaurant is very spacious, but was mostly empty when we wandered in. One of the servers was incredibly friendly and helped us navigate the menu, making suggestions and even overriding some of our choices. Still, we trusted her, figuring that she knew better, especially after our not-so-successful venture at New Szechuan. The other servers were indifferent at best, tossing menus onto our table in a mostly gruff manner, but ah well. I’m used to that kind of service.

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Our first dish, recommended by the server, was the Pan-Fried Green Beans with Minced Pork ($10.95). To be honest, I’m not much a vegetable person, so I was unsure about green beans, but this was a winner. The pork was a bit too salty from having soaked up the sauce, but the beans themselves were crisp and tasty. I liked how they had a slight taste of the sauce while still retaining the crispness of the vegetables. I suppose that it might seem too bland for some people, but we enjoyed it. The portion size was also great, as we ended up packing some for home. (We had ordered three dishes between the three of us).

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Due to my dad’s somewhat restrictive diet, my parents have been opting for a lot of fish and tofu recently, so they were happy when the server also recommended the Braised Rock Cod with Roasted Pork and Deep Fried Tofu Hot Pot ($14.50). Although it was a little pricey for lunch, this dish was well worth it, and well-executed. As a whole, the ingredients were all soft, smooth, and silky, especially the fish. The pork was roasted in small cubes that simply tasted like regular ham. It was a mild broth with cabbage underneath that tasted great with rice.

DSC_0006I ordered the Boneless Chicken Curry ($10). I guess the server approved of my choice as she didn’t offer a better alternative as she did with some other dishes we wanted to try. This curry was mostly sweet and coconutty, and not at all spicy, and quite unlike an Indian curry, which I expected considering the venue. Although it was a tad watery, I still enjoyed eating it with the provided rice. Besides the chicken, the bowl of curry also included potatoes and onions. The coconut flavour was very strong, which I personally love, but if you’re expecting a spicy curry, I wouldn’t recommend this.

DSC_0012After this successful first visit, we returned with my brother near the end of 2012. Out of curiosity, my brother ordered the Half Hainan Chicken ($12). Hainan chicken is simply chicken boiled in a chicken bone stock, served cold. This was our first time having hainan chicken. And to be perfectly honest, we didn’t enjoy it. It’s mostly because we were unfamiliar with this dish, and to someone unfamiliar with the dish, it looks less than appetizing. This particular version was also quite bland, even when paired with the provided chili sauce and ginger oil. We ended up leaving most of this dish untouched. Although we tried to like it, we ultimately couldn’t. I suppose that’s more personal preference than anything else, however, and our opinion is meaningless when evaluating Mui Garden’s hainan chicken compared to other restaurants.

DSC_0013We were served by the same lady on this night, and this time, she recommended the Pork Chop with Spicy Salt and Hot Pepper ($11.50). Although this was a good portion size, the pork itself was a little too tough to eat, and nothing special. Overall, it was an acceptable dish, but not amazing. The pork was quite dry, and although it was well-seasoned, I found it to be a tad too salty for my tastes. Although the menu warned that this was a spicy dish, my primary impression was the saltiness.

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For our carb quotient, we ordered the Special Fried Rice Noodles (Singapore Style) ($9.50). I personally was looking forward to this dish since I’ve always loved rice noodles. These didn’t disappoint, with the noodles being perfectly chewy. The bean sprouts were crispy, and there was a good assortment of ingredients, with plenty of vegetables and shrimp. Surprisingly, there was a spicy aftertaste to the noodles, which added another dimension of flavour to what could have been a simple, boring plate of noodles. One complaint I had was that the noodle to ingredient ratio seemed a bit off, as I would have appreciated even more noodles.

My family really enjoyed both of our visits at Mui Garden. Although some of the waitstaff were surly and silent, one server really went out of her way to make us feel at home, which we appreciated, since this isn’t our native cuisine. The food, in general, was well-prepared, and although the prices are a little higher than I’d prefer, it was still an enjoyable experience. One thing though: they are cash only, so remember to go to the ATM if you’re dependent on plastic like I am. I definitely will be going back though, especially for those green beans!

Mui Garden
4327 North Road
Burnaby, BC

Mui Garden on Urbanspoon


Go Thai

More Thai food, you ask? After our lovely dinner at Bob Likes Thai Food, my dad insisted we try another Thai restaurant a bit closer to home. So on a rainy Saturday night all four of us (sans uncle this time) drove out to Go Thai with open minds. It’s a smaller, much less stylish operation than Bob Likes Thai Food, and even at first glance you can tell that the restaurant itself is quite old. The paint is scratched in places, and the water glasses, although clean, are noticeably scratched up as well. Despite this, the restaurant looked relatively clean and well-operated, and the kitchen floors (which we could see easily from our seats) were spotless.

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We started off with the Tom Yum Gai ($7.95), hot and sour soup with exotic Thai herbs, sliced button mushrooms, and chicken. When the waitress first brought this over to our table, we smelled it before we saw it. For all of us, it strangely reminded us of the smell of Korean fermented bean paste (not a pleasant smell, in case you’re wondering). At first sip, it tasted strongly of lemongrass, and had an almost poisonously spicy aftertaste. Maybe it would be more accurate to describe as “hot” rather than “spicy”, as it left a burning sensation on my lips long after I took several sips of cold water. I personally have a high tolerance for spicy foods, but if you do not, I wouldn’t recommend this.

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Go Thai also offers a varieties of curries, which you can choose to have either with beef, pork, chicken, tofu, or prawns. We opted for the Green Curry ($11.95) with chicken. This was a disappointment. The curry was very thin and watered down. We also felt that the ingredients weren’t integrated properly with the curry itself, as they felt like two separate components. The flavours were noticeably muted, with the only strong flavour being the coconut milk. Besides the chicken, there were also some green peppers and eggplant included.

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And of course we had to have an order of the Pad Thai ($9.95). Added to the usual sweet and sour taste of pad thai was a strangely bitter aftertaste. It was also a little too wet, with the noodles getting lost a bit in the sauce, which was a bit too cold to be enjoyable. The noodles themselves were forgettable, not having enough bite to stand up to the other ingredients. As with the curry, we felt that the ingredients had been rather randomly thrown together. Although the peanuts and bean sprouts added some much needed textural contrast, I would say that this dish was a definite flop.

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We deviated a bit from our usual favourite items and tried the Phad King ($9.95), which you can also try with the same proteins as above. As with the curry, we decided on chicken. This dish was mostly for my dad, as the menu description of sautéed ginger, bell peppers, onions, and mushrooms sounded quite healthy. Sadly, though, my dad didn’t enjoy it, as the sauce was much too watered down. Although the taste of ginger was quite prominent, this was a mediocre, unmemorable dish.

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Next up is the Go Thai Fried Rice ($8.95), with chicken, BBQ pork, egg, tomatoes, onions, and peas. When this first arrived, I felt suspicious: it looked awfully like any old fried rice you can get at your neighbourhood Chinese restaurant. And sad to say, it tasted exactly like your average Chinese fried rice. To their credit, though, the rice wasn’t overly oily or wet, and I would gladly have eaten this in any other circumstance, except that I had expected some bolder flavours.

As you can see, we weren’t too impressed by the dishes we sampled at Go Thai, which were all unmemorable. I found that the bold flavours found in Thai food were all muted, most likely to appeal to the clientele, but the food was simply too bland to enjoy. It’s not like Go Thai has much competition with its location in New West, but, to be honest, I would rather drive out somewhere further for more authentic Thai food rather than eat here again. It wasn’t that Go Thai is necessarily bad, it’s just that there is much better elsewhere.

Go Thai
502 East Columbia Street
New Westminster, BC

Go Thai on Urbanspoon


Chad Thai

My school schedule this term actually isn’t half bad– with classes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays only, I have plenty of time for finishing up school work at school (anyone else find that they can’t focus at home?), plus I can teach and volunteer during the week as well! A side benefit of this schedule is that I have more time to actually go out and eat… which means more blog posts too!

So Samson and I decided to go out one Wednesday night for a quick dinner– with no particular place in mind, we turned to the Hastings Heights, a sure place to find food nearby. Lucky for us, Chad Thai on Hastings and MacDonald was open, and we had heard great things from David, so we decided to try it out.

The restaurant is small, with maybe 15 tables total. Of these, only 1 was occupied when we entered, so we had our pick– a seat near the window, of course! A friendly waitress, who I can only assume is the owner/manager of the family-run joint quickly brought over menus and water, and let us know about the daily special.

There was so much on the menu, we were really unsure of what to pick! We ended up with the daily special and two salads (one cold and one warm), as well as some rice on the side. First up was the Som Tum, or green papaya salad. This version had plenty of shredded carrots, radish and peanuts as well as tomato chunks, green beans and dried shrimp, but was a little under-stocked on the green papaya. The dressing was pretty typical– tart from the lime and tamarind, sweet and spicy– but I appreciated that we were able to choose the degree of spice (we had the mild for everything, since we were new to the place). This was definitely a good starter, as it was crisp and very refreshing.

Next up was the Nam Tok Moo, a warm pork salad with bits of pounded roasted rice (which didn’t taste too much like rice, because it was the tiny bits were all spread out and covered with sauce), dressed with slices of red onion, and plenty of green onions, mint and cilantro. The pork slices were thinly sliced and had just enough fat to make it deliciously textured without being overly unhealthy. The dressing for this salad tasted a little bit like a spicier fish sauce mix, which was again tart with a hint of spice. We probably could have ordered this in the hot (I definitely would next time I come here).

For our main dish, we had the Khao Soi curry noodles, which actually included two types of noodle– a flat egg noodle reminiscent of Chinese ho fun, and a crunchy noodle topping. With the noodles came an abundance of moist chicken pieces, as well as cilantro and green onion garnishes and sides of pickled radish, hot sauce and a lime wedge. The best part of the dish was the curry soup, which was very coconutty and creamy– the stuff of comfort foods. I liked this so much that I had a craving for it the next day, and it’s rare that I want the same dish two days in a row.

In addition to this, we actually ordered a bowl of Coconut Rice as well so we had something to soak up the sauce (for this and for the Nam Tok Moo). This was one of the best bowls of coconut rice I’ve had– it was very aromatic and sweet, and the rice was decently fluffy and not too hard, like it had been sitting in a cooker all day. Size-wise, this was a pretty good deal too: for $3, we received a huge bowl of it, and could barely finish it all.

We decided to deviate from our regular routine and ordered dessert at the restaurant instead of going to a different place. Now, I forgot to take a picture of he Vanilla Ice Cream with Topping, but basically we got a big bowl of ice cream with palm seeds on top (this photo is from khiewchanta.com, a Thai recipe site that also conveniently has pictures of the more ethnic ingredients used in Thai cuisine.) This was a real treat on a hot day– the ice cream was a little on the icy side (which I actually appreciated) and was very vanilla-y as well, though I don’t believe they make their own ice cream here. We decided to be adventurous and chose palm seeds for our single topping, and I’m glad we did. These chewy, translucent gelatinous balls changed up the dessert texturally, and while they didn’t have too much of a flavour profile beyond “sweet”, I really enjoyed them! So much so that I ended up buying a can of palm seeds from PriceSmart Foods (the exact brand above) so I could replicate the dessert at home.

Overall, both Samson and I felt that this was a very satisfying meal, as the food was obviously prepared with care by the kitchen staff (I feel like maybe there was only 1 cook back there… I didn’t hear too much coming from the kitchen aside from cooking sounds). The woman who greeted us and the teenaged boy who served us were both friendly and helpful, even when I made the weird request of asking for more cilantro for my noodles. They took the time to explain dishes to us, and really contributed to making our visit a great one. I could see also that the locals like to come here– lots of people came to get take out orders, and while not many tables were filled that night, I could tell that the patrons there enjoyed themselves as much as I did (one family actually ordered two of the same dish because the son loved it so much he wanted it for lunch the next day… maybe I should have done that!). Our meal came to about $25 each, which is a little bit on the high side for the neighbourhood and kind of establishment, but for the quality of food and service, I would gladly spend my money here again.

Chad Thai
4010 East Hastings Street
Burnaby, BC

Chad Thai on Urbanspoon