The Old Tom

When first contemplating my visit to the UK, I wasn’t too excited about the food prospects. Nothing really sprang to mind when considering British cuisine, other than fish and chips and meat pies. Now I realize I was being close-minded, and that reducing British food to those two items would be like summarizing Canadian food as maple syrup and poutine (which I’m sure happens often enough). Like any country with large and diverse immigrant populations, the UK offers a variety of different cuisines to be indulged in.

While in Oxford, we had dinner one night at The Old Tom. The Old Tom was particularly interesting to me because while it serves Thai food, it still somewhat functions as the classic British pub (which to me just comes down to whether or not they serve Pimm’s). We were seated in an outdoor area behind the actual restaurant, where we could enjoy the summer air, although this was somewhat marred by the cigarette smoke issuing from nearby tables.

DSCN1062We started off with an order of the Vegetable Tempura (£3.95), which consisted of an interesting assortment of vegetables: carrots, onions, and red and green peppers. I’m not sure why they called this “tempura” on the menu, because the batter was clearly something different altogether. Although the items came out warm, it felt like they had used old oil, or that the items had been fried too long. The homemade chili sauce was both sweet and spicy. As far as appetizers go, this wasn’t terrible, but I probably wouldn’t order it again. I suppose fried items are just a pub staple.

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Shawarma indulged in a classic in the Pad Thai with Chicken (£7.95), complete with all the usual suspects: rice noodles, egg, bean sprouts, and ground peanuts. She was pleasantly surprised by this dish, as we honestly hadn’t expected anything great. Although the dish as a whole was slightly oily, it had that requisite tang from the tamarind. The noodles were slightly on the soft side, but the chicken was flavourless, although this was slightly ameliorated by the sauce. Pickles, who also had the pad thai, remarked that it was better than the version at Wagamama, although I guess that really isn’t saying much…

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I opted for the Green Curry with Prawns (£8.95), with coconut milk, bamboo shoots, fresh chilies, sweet basil leaves, and peas, served with some steamed rice. The curry was on the sweet side, but still had a nice spicy kick. Like Shawarma, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this, as I hadn’t been expecting much from this small Oxford pub. In hindsight, I would have expected the curry itself to be a tad thicker, but it was nothing too troubling, and I was satisfied that they’d included five or six sizeable prawns. The rice was simple steamed rice and nothing too special, although it was clumped up a bit in places.

Overall, the food at the Old Tom wasn’t anything I would call exceptional, but it was more than acceptable, especially considering where we were. It’s necessary to have realistic expectations, right? I wouldn’t expect Oxford’s Asian restaurants to be on par with Vancouver’s. That being said, though, the Old Tom was a nice way to experience the quintessential British pub while having something other than conventional pub fare.

The Old Tom
101 Saint Aldate’s
Oxford, UK OX1 1BT

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Wagamama

During our stay in Oxford, we ended up taking the train down to London again, as we had the opportunity to visit Canada House, part of the High Commission of Canada in London. As it was located right in Trafalgar Square, it was a great opportunity for us to visit attractions that we’d missed out on during our stay in London. We visited the National Portrait Gallery, which houses the portraits of what seems like every notable British person ever. It’s an interesting lens through which to view British history, and like the British Museum and the Natural History Museum, admission is free.

Before all this, though, we stopped by Wagamama for a quick lunch. I was wary of Wagamama, as I had been of most Asian restaurants in London. Wagamama reminded me of The Noodle Box in Vancouver, a very Westernized “Asian” restaurant serving a mix of dishes from different Asian cuisines.

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I had the Cha Han (£7.80), fried rice with chicken and prawns, mangetout (snow peas), mushrooms, sweetcorn and spring onions, served with a side of miso soup and pickles. The miso soup was the usual predictably salty fare, with tiny tofu cubes and some seaweed. The rice itself was, strangely enough, too oily yet too dry at the same time, but also a tiny bit undercooked. I added some soy sauce to moisten it, which helped. I liked how the veggies were in smaller pieces, as it made them easier to eat, especially in the case of the snow peas. The chicken was sufficiently moist, and the prawns had a nice snap to them. Overall, though, it wasn’t a particularly memorable meal.

DSCN0977Dolph’s Chili Men (£10.95) included prawns, zucchini, red onions, peppers, mushrooms, and mangetout in a spicy tomato chili sauce, on soba noodles. With that variety of ingredients, it sounded delicious, but it fell short of the description. The noodles were quite limp and not chewy enough, while the sauce was one-dimensional, simply being spicy with no other real flavours.

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Shawarma opted for the Chili Ramen (£9.65), noodles in a spicy chicken soup topped with grilled chicken, red and spring onions, beansprouts and chilies, garnished with coriander and lime. Like Dolph’s noodles above, Shawarma found her ramen lacking, as there was not much in the way of flavour. While the chilies added some spice, the broth was mostly thin and bland. The noodles were disappointingly mushy, not chewy as ramen should be. She also thought that the dish was quite overpriced, as it really was nothing special.

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Pickles had the Pad Thai (£9.55), with egg, beansprouts, leek, red and spring onions, Chinese chives, garlic, ginger and chilies, fried shallots, and peanuts. Despite the plethora of ingredients, she wasn’t very impressed, having had many a good pad thai in her day. She commented that this version lacked flavour, and that it would have benefitted from more sauce.

Overall, we were underwhelmed by our lunch at Wagamama. Hailing from Vancouver, where there are so many excellent examples of Asian cuisine, I suppose I had some unrealistically high standards when it comes to Asian food, especially since I was lucky enough to grow up with my mother’s cooking. Wagamama is fine for a quick lunch, but it’s nothing I would heartily recommend to someone.

DSCN0989After lunch, our group ventured to Canada House, where we were given a tour of the rooms and provided with a quick history of the building. Following this, we ventured across Trafalgar Square to visit the National Portrait Gallery. Trafalgar Square was even more packed than usual, due to a Scotland vs. England soccer (or, as the British say, football) game taking place that day. Scotsmen in kilts filled the square, downing countless beers (and leaving ten thousand empty cans to be disposed of the next day). Before I visited the U.K., I’d always thought of “British” as more or less a single identity, but now I realize how wrong that is. I learned to clearly distinguish between “English” and “British”, as the latter includes the Scottish and the Welsh in addition to the English. One regret I have about my trip was that I didn’t get to spend much time in the English countryside other than passing through it on my way to and from London.

In any case, I suppose lunch at Wagamama was a fond memory for us, but it definitely paled in comparison to more exciting aspects of the day, including experiencing firsthand the boisterousness of drunken Scotsmen. Ah, London.

Wagamama
14 Irving Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7AF

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Jamie’s Italian

The last of the four novels we studied during our time in London was Angela Carter’s Wise Children. I’d previously read a few selected stories from The Bloody Chamber, so I was excited to delve into Carter’s curious world of magic realism. To be honest, I preferred The Bloody Chamber, as there’s something about reimagined fairy tales that really sparks my interest. Anyways, as part of our tour of the neighbourhood in which Wise Children takes place, we had lunch at Jamie Oliver’s Diner, a pop-up restaurant on London’s Shaftesbury Avenue. It was a decent meal, but nothing memorable.

Then fast forward a couple weeks to one night in Oxford. The girls decided to try out Jamie’s Italian, another of Jamie Oliver’s restaurant ventures. Due to the size of our group, we were seated at two different tables, but served by the same waiter. I’m not sure how to describe the waiter, except to say that we honestly didn’t like him. He was quite awkward and seemed disappointed that some of us only ordered drinks or appetizers. Sure, I realize that you need your tips, but to overtly express disappointment isn’t going to help you, right?

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Katy wasn’t too hungry, so she just had the Crab and Avocado Bruschetta (£6.50), grilled sourdough topped with Start Bay crab, avocado, and Yeo Valley yoghurt, with apple matchsticks, chili, mint, lemon, and olive oil. Despite the decadence of that description, Katy found her bruschetta a bit unappetizing, as it was served quite cold, which she didn’t enjoy.

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Chantallyhoo and Shawarma both had the Tagliatelle Bolognese (£9.95), with a ragu of British beef and pork, with herbs, chianti, Parmesan, and crunchy, herby breadcrumbs. Again, a decadent description, but the dish didn’t live up to it. The pasta was undercooked, being quite clumpy and hard to chew, while the sauce was underwhelming and very bland. It needed a lot of pepper to be somewhat enjoyable. Also, we were all surprised by the small portions. The items mostly came in two sizes (a smaller “entree” size and a larger portion), but even the larger portions were quite small. I had no idea, but apparently outside of North America, “entree” means a small course served before the main course. Having spent most of my life on the West Coast, this was a rather strange concept to me, and one that actually impacted our enjoyment of our meal here overall. When some of us accidentally ordered entree-sized portions without realizing that “entree” doesn’t mean the same thing it does in North America, the waiter reacted by condescendingly informing us of the difference, as opposed to offering us the larger portions. Considering how awkwardly he recounted the specials, I think that he was relatively new at his job, but wouldn’t it be common sense to try and make a customer feel happy as opposed to stupid?

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As for me, I had the Seaside Risotto (£12.50), with clams, mussels, prawns, cockles, gurnard, chili, and white wine. I found the risotto to be a tad undercooked, but I believe that’s personal preference, as I generally prefer my pasta to be softer than al dente as well (blasphemous, I know). The fish was well-prepared, being moist throughout, and the mussels were plump and briney, exactly the way they should be. However, I thought that the risotto itself could have been creamier; perhaps more cheese would have helped? I also was dissatisfied with the portion size, especially considering the price tag.

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Madeline’s Fish Stew (£13.50), which was on special that night, was comprised of the same seafood as my risotto, although in a tomato-based broth. Although the seafood was well-prepared, with plump and juicy clams and mussels, she commented that she wished she’d ordered a pasta instead, which would have been much more filling. It was a pricey dish, probably due to the amount of seafood included. I feel like it would have worked well as a risotto, pretty much the same as mine above but with a tomato-based sauce.

Overall, we were all quite disappointed with our experience at Jamie’s Italian, especially considering its association with celebrity chef Jamie Oliver. The food was mediocre, and the service was startlingly inept, awkward, and even condescending. Based on the two experiences I had with Jamie Oliver’s restaurants during my time in the UK, I probably would not return.

Jamie’s Italian
24-26 George Street
Oxford, United Kingdom OX1 2

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The Eagle and Child

After three eventful weeks in London, we all uprooted and relocated to Oxford. The journey itself was pleasant, as Oxford is only an hour and a half’s train ride away from London, and the countryside views are nothing if not picturesque.

To put it mildly, I loved Oxford. I was fortunate enough to stay in accommodations usually occupied by actual Oxford University students. Our apartment (or “flat”, as the Brits say) was quite spacious and homey. Our classes also took place in a classroom at Oxford’s Brasenose College, so although I didn’t actually learn from any Oxford professors, it was somewhat like getting the Oxford experience, especially since we also had access to the Bodleian Library.

Overall, though, I liked the small town vibe that Oxford had, especially compared to London. Everything was within walking distance, and I no longer had to suffer the mugginess and crampedness of traveling on the tube. As we now had a kitchen in our flat, we relied more on our own cooking than on eating out, but of course we still had to eat out sometimes. Our first group dinner in Oxford was at the famed Eagle and Child, a pub a few minutes’ walk from our accommodations.

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The Eagle and Child is a tourist destination in Oxford in its own right, as it was famously the hang-out of a literary discussion group called the Inklings, whose most famous members included J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. Due to the size of our large group, we got the whole back room to ourselves, where, funnily enough, they’d labelled a random door as the entryway to Narnia. I mean, we all know that the entryway to Narnia is through a magical wardrobe in Professor Kirke’s house (or by the other methods shown in the other six books in the series), but it’s still a cute touch. There was also a map of the magical world of Narnia on the door, showing Narnia and its southern neighbours, Archenland and Calormen. I devoured the Narnia books as a child, and having dinner in the same place that C.S. Lewis regularly visited was quite exciting for me, in an admittedly geeky way. Other than that, though, the Eagle and Child was not unlike the other pubs I visited during my time in England. The decor was quaint and functional, while the food leaned towards the traditional rather than the imaginative.

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Pickles had the Fish and Chips (£10.75), which was served alongside some mushy peas and tartar sauce. I was mostly impressed by the size of the piece of cod, as it was massive, especially considering the price. She found that the fish was a bit dry on the edges, which is quite standard for fish and chips. Still, she enjoyed how crispy the fish was, and that the batter was not too heavy or thick. The chips were the thick, starchy, potatoey kind, which I personally don’t prefer, but what’s a visit to the U.K. without trying some fish and chips?

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I was lucky enough to be sitting beside Sim and she graciously allowed me to snap a photo of her dinner, which was the Vegetable Burger (£7.95). The menu stated that the veggie patty was composed of spiced aubergine, red pepper, sweetcorn, and chickpeas, but Sim commented that it mostly tasted like chickpeas. She enjoyed the burger as the patty was nice and crispy, as were the accompanying chips, which were again the thick variety. The burger also came with some coleslaw on the side.

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Stacy and Catherine also shared a Tear and Share Cheesy Garlic Bread (£4.75). They were actually away from the table when it arrived, and it smelled so heavenly that we were all tempted to steal a bite. It reminded me of the clam chowder bread bowls I’d really liked as a child. I’m a sucker for anything that comes in an edible container. Anyways, this bread was filled with a thick, creamy garlic and cheddar sauce, and it was exactly what was expected, being warm and satisfying. Surprisingly, it also wasn’t messy at all, which I might have guessed from the look of the dish when it first arrived.

DSCN0927As for me, I had the Basket of Fish (£10.75), which included scampi, goujons (strips of fish), and calamari, as well as the requisite chips and tartar sauce. Everything was lightly fried, a bit oily as expected, but not too heavy, which I liked. The fish itself was light and flaky, while the calamari was quite tender. The chips were the same as the ones served above, but for some reason, I really liked the tartar sauce. I’m generally not a fan of tartar sauce, but the one here was light and tangy, which complemented the fish well. I usually find fish and chips to be a heavy meal, but I didn’t feel too bloated here, and I had plenty of room left for dessert. To add to the Britishness of my meal, I also indulged in a glass of Pimm’s.

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Luckily enough, we still had room for dessert, so Sim and I shared a Warm Chocolate Brownie (£4.25)which was served with vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce. It’s not like this was anything special or unique, but it was certainly a nice way to end our meal. The brownie had a nice crust to it, with softer, chewier layers underneath, and the cool, sweet ice cream helped to provide a textural contrast. It was also of a decent size to share between two people after the meal we’d consumed above.

Overall, the food we sampled at The Eagle and Child was quite yummy, and of course it was exciting to eat at the favourite haunt of the Inklings. If you’re passing through Oxford, I’d definitely recommend having a meal here, if only to experience the vibe of the quintessential British pub. Oh, and don’t forget to have some Pimm’s as well!

The Eagle and Child
49 St. Giles
Oxford, United Kingdom OX1 3LU

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Spaghetti House

One lovely morning in London, Pickles, Chantallyhoo and I decided to head off to Harrod’s. Not to shop, obviously, but just to visit one of London’s most famous landmarks. In all honesty, I found shopping in London to be quite expensive, although I was excited about the number of shops that aren’t available in Vancouver, including River Island and Uniqlo. Harrod’s was an interesting experience to be sure, and the three of us made a few purchases at the gift shop, where the prices are much more on par with what the average tourist can afford to spend.

After our little adventure, it was time for lunch. We walked around looking for a McDonald’s or a Pret a Manger or even a Starbucks, but for some reason, we were unable to find anything even remotely fast food-like. Since we still needed to eat, we wandered into Spaghetti House, where we were promptly seated and received our food quite quickly.

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I had the Penne Arrabiata (£8.75), with spicy tomato sauce, crushed red chilies, and cherry tomatoes. It was a rather sticky and muggy London day, and this was served piping hot. While that’s usually a good thing, for some reason my pasta stayed hot to the end, and verged on being uncomfortable to eat. I personally would have preferred the pasta itself to be a little bit softer, as I felt it was a tad undercooked, but the tomatoes added a perfect sweetness, while the chilies had that promised dimension of spiciness. Ultimately, this was a filling bowl of pasta, and I would probably order this again, if it hadn’t been inexplicably hot.

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Chantallyhoo went with a classic in the Spaghetti Bolognese (£9.95). She quite enjoyed her pasta, remarking that the noodles themselves were quite chewy, with a bouncy, toothsome texture. She found the sauce a bit watery, but that it didn’t detract from her overall enjoyment of her meal. Overall, she thought that it was a filling and comforting bowl of pasta.

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Pickles had the Margherita Pizza (£7.95). She didn’t have much to say about her pizza, saying that it tasted quite average. She found that the flavours were balanced but that the pizza itself was nothing special. I think that’s a good summary of our experience here overall. I quite enjoyed my lunch, but mostly due to the conversation rather than the food itself. If I were in the area again, I would probably want to try something else.

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After lunch, the three of us ventured to the Natural History Museum. Like the British Museum, the Natural History Museum is publicly funded, and, therefore, free for the general public, although donations are welcome. That being said, the line to get in was quite long, but well worth it. Vancouver isn’t exactly a hotspot for museums, and we had a lovely afternoon just admiring fossils, samples of various minerals, and such.

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Even if you’re not interested in natural history (although how anyone wouldn’t be interested in dinosaurs and mineral formations is beyond me), the building itself was astoundingly beautiful. In some ways, it reminded me of New York’s Grand Central Station, and in other ways it reminded me of Hogwarts. I suppose I’m just trying to point out the grandeur of the architecture. The wide open space provided a perfect backdrop for the larger-than-life displays, and navigating the area was easier than you’d think, with helpful maps and signs in clearly designated locations. The gift shop was definitely more geared towards children, with arrays of stuffed animals and other toys, although that didn’t stop us from picking up our own souvenirs. I only wished we’d arrived earlier so we could have spent more time poring over more exhibits.

Out of the tourist spots that I visited in London, the Natural History Museum was one of my favourites. As much as I love discussing literature and British imperial history, spending the day amongst fossils and other ancient objects was a welcome and much-needed break. Although the Natural History Museum hadn’t been on my list of sights to see in London, I’m glad that I got to spend an afternoon here.

Spaghetti House
77 Knightsbridge
London, UK  SW1X 7RB

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Busaba Eathai

Despite my incessant raving about Japanese food on this blog, I would have to say that Thai food is also one of my favourite cuisines. I only discovered the magic of Thai food about a year ago, which is when my uncle visited us in Vancouver and we had dinner at Bob Likes Thai Food. From then on, I’ve been enamoured of Thai food, and regularly try out new places in Vancouver, although none have surpassed Bob.

While I was in London, this same uncle happened to be in town for work, and of course we decided to meet up. It was strange to see him in a city that neither of us call home, but after nearly a month without any direct contact with family, it was comforting to see a face that was so much like my dad’s.

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We started off our afternoon by visiting Westminster Abbey. I thought I’d become desensitized to churches and cathedrals of all kinds, but I was wrong. Although it lacks the majestic Gothic beauty of the Notre Dame and the simplistic elegance of the Basilica de Sacré-Coeur, I thought Westminster Abbey was impressive simply due to its size. It reminded me of a scene in C.S. Lewis’s The Last Battle, which is the last book in The Chronicles of Narnia. In the series’s finale, Lucy and Peter and the others find themselves in a magical, idealized version of Narnia, which appears to grow larger and larger as they venture further in. That’s a bit of a digression, but that’s how Westminster Abbey felt to me. It was also exciting to see the tombs of what seemed like every famous British person ever, from Queen Elizabeth I to Charles Dickens. Of course, in more recent news, the abbey was also the site of Prince William’s 2011 marriage to Kate Middleton.

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Once we were done exploring the abbey, we stepped out into the muggy, sticky London weather. After taking a few tourist photos with Big Ben, we headed for an early dinner at a Thai restaurant that my uncle had visited numerous times before on previous visits to London. I was happy to be able to indulge in tasty Thai food, as my last experience with Thai cuisine in London had been nothing but disappointing.

Busaba Eathai offers a clean and spacious atmosphere for dining, with two arrangements of seats available. The first is a square wooden table with a wooden bench on each side, which is perfect for large groups. I also saw several of these tables seating two pairs of couples at opposite corners, which is a good option for maximizing the restaurant’s space while minimizing the awkwardness felt when sharing a table with strangers. The second type of seats, which we chose, were window seats that looked out onto a not-too-interesting London street. I liked our seats, which allowed us to have a quiet conversation while enjoying our food.

DSCN0765We decided to share three dishes, the first being the Tom Yam Talay (£6.90), a spicy, sour soup with prawns, squid, fish cakes, and vermicelli noodles. The soup had that strong lemongrass flavour that I always associate with Thai soups, being more sour and tangy than spicy. I loved that they weren’t skimpy with the seafood, and that the prawns were large and juicy. Considering the atmosphere of the restaurant and the quality of the food, I also thought that the prices were decent, especially considering that the restaurant was located near some tourist hotspots, especially the National Gallery.

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Next, we made a very predictable choice in ordering the Pad Thai (£8.20). The rice noodles were accompanied by the requisite prawns, tofu, egg, ground peanuts, bean sprouts, and a wedge of lime. Fortunately for us, this was deliciously tart, tasting of real tamarind sauce as opposed to ketchup. As with the soup, the shrimp tasted fresh, retaining their natural snap and sweetness. The noodles were toothsome, and the other ingredients all tasted as they should. It wasn’t a life-changing plate of noodles, but it was certainly memorable.

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Lastly, we indulged in more carbs with the Crab Meat Egg Fried Rice (£7.20). I suppose if I had to pick a disappointing dish out of this meal, it would be this one, but only because the other dishes were excellent. There was nothing inherently wrong with this dish, as the rice was slightly moist, and the crab meat added an unexpected dimension of flavour. It simply didn’t have any special appeal, and tasted like any other version of fried rice. I’ve found this to be the case with fried rice at many Thai restaurants, and maybe it’s my fault for continuing to order it despite this. Still, for the price we paid, this was a decently sized portion, and quite satisfying, although ultimately unmemorable.

Overall, I had a great time catching up with my uncle over the food at Busaba Eathai. It was by far the most satisfying experience I had with Thai cuisine in the UK, as it tasted quite similar to the Thai food available in Vancouver. Although I personally have never been to Thailand and therefore cannot vouch for the actual authenticity of the food here, my uncle enjoyed our meal as well, and he’s been to Thailand numerous times and knows much more about Thai cuisine than I do. In any case, if you’re ever in London and have an intense craving for Thai food, I would heartily recommend the dishes that I tried.

Busaba Eathai
35 Panton Street
London, UK SW1 Y4EA

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Baxter’s

Following Monica Ali’s Brick Lane, the second of our class presentations revolved around Sarah Waters’s 2002 novel Fingersmith. I never considered myself a huge fan of Victorian novels, since the sheer length of the books always deterred me from reading them. Still, one book that will always remain close to my heart is Dickens’s Great Expectations. I don’t know what it is about that book, but something about the complex plot and Pip’s unrequited love for Estella set against the backdrop of industrial London is simply so memorable. In any case, Fingersmith reminded me a great deal of Great Expectations, but of course with a modern twist. I guess “twist” is the key word when it comes to Fingersmith

Luckily enough, Fingersmith is largely set in the Borough, which was a quick walk from our accommodations. We had the chance to walk down Lant Street, which figures prominently in the novel, and was also the home of Charles Dickens. Once we were done exploring the world of Fingersmith, we were set loose in the Borough Market to procure our lunches.

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The market is situated right beside Southwark Cathedral. I think that the thing that most struck me about London, and Europe in general, is just how old everything is. Living in Vancouver, everything is relatively new, while in London, you can still see remnants of Roman architecture, which is just astounding. The idea that you can still casually walk along the street where Dickens used to live just boggled my mind. We visited many churches and cathedrals during our stay in Europe, and the beauty of the buildings is just breathtaking. I’m not a religious person by any means, but I do think that religious buildings are often the most beautiful, whether it be a church or a mosque or a Buddhist temple.

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The Borough Market offers a wide variety of stalls to choose from. After some hopeful wandering, I stopped in front of Baxter’s. I’ve mentioned my affinity for “exotic meats” before, and I’d just realized that I’d never tried wild boar before. Also, I was quite hungry, and it was a dreary, rainy day, and I was in the mood for something warm and filling. Baxter’s appeared to be family-run, and everyone was friendly and helpful when answering my questions.

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I decided on the Wild Boar Sausage (£6), which comes in two sizes: small or large, of which I got the latter. Basically the only difference between the two sizes is whether you get one or two sausages. The sausages come enveloped in a ciabatta bun, accompanied by some arugula (or, as the Brits say, “rocket”) and onions. This was my first time having wild boar, and, as expected, it was quite similar to pork, with a slight gameyness. The sausage itself was meaty, with some chunks of tasty fat and a bit of spice to alleviate the richness of the meat. I would have preferred the bun to have been toasted slightly, as there was nothing special about it, but the sausage was so flavourful that it really didn’t need much. They also added a dash of peppercorn sauce, which just enhanced the flavours. And, of course, the veggies also helped to cut the richness of the sausage. This was definitely one of the most satisfying meals I had in London, especially when eaten outside while ducking to avoid the rain. I also had an Iced Earl Grey Tea from another stall in the market, which was flavoured with a mint leaf and lemon. I liked how the tea wasn’t overly sweetened, which is often the case with iced tea.

DSCN0738After a satisfying meal and a lazy, relaxed afternoon of shopping, we had quite an evening to look forward to: seeing Wicked at the Apollo Victoria Theatre. Despite never having seen the musical itself, I’ve been a fan of the music since the eighth grade, due to some influence from my brother and a couple of friends. So I was incredibly excited to see it for myself. And although I adore listening to the soundtrack from the original Broadway cast, seeing it on stage is just another experience altogether. The two leads were immensely talented, and the plot of the play is just so fast-paced and jam-packed with musical numbers that you never have the chance to feel bored. Out of my three theatre experiences in London (the other two being Pride and Prejudice in Regent’s Park and A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Rose Theatre), this was by far my favourite.

This is a bit of a digression, but I’ve also read Gregory Maguire’s original novel, Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, off of which the musical is based. The novel’s universe is vastly different from the musical, with the novel delving more into the serious issues briefly explored in the musical. Personally, I enjoy the musical more, as the novel is a bit dense and difficult to understand, but it’s good, although not essential, to have knowledge of both works.

In any case, I realize this post was only minimally about the food, but I just felt the need to recount one of my favourite days that I got to spend in London: a yummy lunch, shopping amid the hustle and bustle of Oxford Street, and then getting to see a musical. What could be better?

Baxter’s
8 Southwark Street
London, UK SE1 1TL

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